Models of Communication for the Twenty-First Century

The Digital Age has allowed for some level of anonymity and inability for people to prejudge others until a post, comment or reply has been made.  These posts, comments and replies are informed by users’ presumptions, thoughts, beliefs, socioeconomic status, ethnocultural background, gender, etc.

There is very little face-to-face interaction “these days.”  You have relatively anonymous commenters, posters, “trolls,” what have you, and there is very little accountability.  Posturing is much more common and bullying is just as prevalent now as it ever was, if not more so.

  • Message from A to B or B to A (interexchange);
  • A and B interpret and respond to each other (and the infinite observers);
  • The infinite observers comment, reply and “troll” A and B and vice versa;
  • Spiraling (and sometimes irrelevant) conflict, resolution, solution or nonsense.

Communication has become a lot more complex in the new millennium and as such needs an updated theory.  There have been few notorious media theories since Marshall McLuhan and this is an attempt to start one going into 2020 and beyond.

Regardless of the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional media of interaction and communication (eg. newspaper, radio, TV) and digital media (social media and the Internet), people must move in this direction if they choose to integrate effectively into society and the workforce.

The emphasis was typically on the communicator(s) as the most important individual(s) in the interaction of various personal expressions between and among individuals.  One individual was actively relaying the message and the other was passively receiving it.

  • Message from A to B (communicator to receiver);
  • B interprets and responds to A (receiver to communicator);
  • Result of that communication (eg. resolution, solution, conflict, etc.)

This occurred mostly face-to-face with some snail mail correspondence and generally within single confined spaces at any one given time. 

1), 2), and 3) were collectively the “communication process,” and it was just a matter of repeating this pattern of interaction.

Traditional Models of Communication Models of Communication in the Twenty-First Century

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